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A perfect start for your
creativity in the kitchen

About Michael


A man of many hats, Michael Flores is a busy trained chef, cooking instructor, spokesperson, cookbook author, brother, son, friend and avid entertainer. Since early childhood he has honed his cooking skills and tasting talents, taking both to new heights through formal training and endless experimentation. While attending the prestigious Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY, Michael worked as chef-intern to Chef Susan Spicer of New Orleans' acclaimed Bayona. Upon graduating with honors from the CIA, Michael returned to San Antonio to begin his career, infusing every dish he creates with his love of the multicultural richness that has so influenced his life.

Uncap the sweet, spicy, savory, sassy and sublime passion of Michael Flores and share it with the ones you love. Add even more adventure to your kitchen capers by experimenting with recipes from My Family-My Friends-My Food: Recipes Celebrating People and Life, Michael's easy-to-use, gregarious cookbook.


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San Pascual was a 16th century Spanish shepherd who became a simple Franciscan monk at the age of 24. He served his fellow Franciscans in various capacities and monasteries as shepherd, gardener, porter, and cook. It was reported that Brother Pascual’s cupboards were always miraculously refilled. San Pascual was known for his administrations to the poor and for his many miraculous cures. It is said that he was a mystic and could summon the angels at will to help him with his kitchen chores so he could have time to pray.
Today San Pascual is chiefly known as a patron of the kitchen in token of his work as a cook. In New Mexico his image has become a ubiquitous element of “Santa Fe-inspired” décor. San Pascual is patron of shepherds, cooks, and Eucharistic Congresses and associations. He is also known to be the guardian of the home.
A little known fact is that many cultures pray to San Pascual to assist in finding lost articles. Often called the “dancing Saint,” a song is sung to the Saint asking for help finding the lost object, “San Pascual Bailón, si lo encuentras te bailo un son!” (San Pascual Bailón, if you find it I will dance you a song!) Upon finding the lost piece a dance is offered up to the Saint.
Born on May 24, 1541 in Zaragosa, Spain, Pascual Bailón died in Villa Real on May 17, 1592 at the age of 51. As his body lay in state it did not decompose – A sign of Saintliness. He was a person who found Divine purpose in as simple a task as cooking.

My Family, My Friends, My Food, Recipes Celebrating People & Life by Michael H. Flores


With a foreword written by acclaimed chef Susan Spicer , this collection of almost 200 recipes written by Michael serves as his gastronomic autobiography-whetting the readers' appetites with culinary delights fondly remembered from the kitchens of relatives, family friends, professional colleagues, cooking school teachers, and even a childhood housekeeper. And it all comes seasoned with a dash of creativity. Flores's San Antonio roots are found throughout the book, while international touches make the dishes unique. With a well-organized layout and a diverse selection of recipes, from down-home to gourmet, anyone excited about food should find something of interest in this cookbook.

My Family, My Friends, My Food is made up of traditional sections and one devoted to Tex and Mex, which features comfort-food favorites like Beef Brisket, Sloppy Joes, Migas, and Chili con Carne. The adventuresome cook won't be disappointed, especially if she looks through the For Starters, On the Side, and Fish sections, which offer inventive ideas, including Spinach and Oyster Empanadas with Fennel Aioli, Roquefort Custards, Mashed Chipotle Sweet Potatoes, Tarragon-White Grape Carrots, Beer Boiled Shrimp with Raspberry Cocktail Sauce, and Mango-Glazed Tuna with Moroccan Guacamole.

Flores includes an introductory section on basic preparation techniques, term identifications, and product recommendations to help make his readers' culinary handiwork "taste more like the ones I created in my kitchen." He continues this endeavor with introductions for each chapter that outline each section and provide some basic information on the forthcoming recipes (for example, a discussion of the difference between a hors d'oeuvre and an appetizer).

~Texas Monthly Magazine